Kimchee Noodle Soup with Tofu and Vegetables

It’s the holiday season! Like, really, really. Christmas is just over one week away–how did it creep up so fast? Considering we’ve been doing our best to set the mood for festive spirits since Halloween, you’d think I’d be feeling prepared. Actually, I am feeling merry and bright but also over-tired, prone to overthinking, a little run down and probably on the edge of the same icky cold that has been waiting in the wings and launching onto my back at every bent, weary opportunity. Chances are, you’re not feeling all that dissimilar…because, holidays! Which makes this super easy, soothing, whole body warming pot of deliciousness perfect for you (as long as you like kimchi).

I got the idea for this lovely one pot meal from a kimchi soup recipe by Dr. Weil in a book I got to peek at while visiting my sister in San Fransisco. I had intended to go back to it to actually read the ingredients and jot down notes, but it was a whirlwind visit and there wasn’t time. When I got home, I guesstimated what might have been in the dish and hope the concoction I threw together wouldn’t offend the esteemed Dr. Weil. Either way, I sure enjoyed it, three times over so far. You can surely transform it to whatever you like in a pinch–scrap the tofu, change up the vegetables, consider simply throwing in a bag of frozen vegetables to save time.  Basically, just revel in what a lovely broth base kimchi makes.

Beyond what enthusing has already taken place, I won’t wax on for once about this dish. Because, again, holidays (tiredness/everything that came before this point)! Just know, this aromatic comfort food is effortless to prepare, yet packs a steamy flavor punch that feels like an instant immunity boost. That precious combination is priceless this time of year especially, like a bonus of free expedited shipping with no restrictions Christmas week. Happy holidays, friends. 🙂

 

Kimchi Noodle Soup with Tofu and Vegetables
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup mushrooms, sliced
  2. 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  3. 1 medium carrot, sliced on the diagonal
  4. 1 cup snow peas, sliced on the diagonal
  5. 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  6. 16 ounces kimchi (of desired heat--I used mild) with liquid (appro 2 cups)
  7. 2 cups vegetable broth
  8. 2 cups water
  9. 1/4 cup low sodium soy sauce
  10. 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  11. 1 14-ounce package extra firm tofu, cubed
  12. approximately 9-ounces Asian noodles of choice (such as udon or rice noodles)
Instructions
  1. Heat a large stockpot, coated with cooking spray, over medium high heat. Add carrots, garlic and mushrooms and cook, stirring, approximately 2 minutes or until edges begin to brown slightly.
  2. Add carrots and next 8 ingredients, through tofu. Simmer for 5 minutes, or until vegetables are just tender.
  3. Bring to a low boil and add noodles. Decrease heat to medium and cook until noodles are desired tenderness.
Happy Apple Natural Kitchen http://www.happyapplekitchen.com/

Vegan slow cooker Scotch broth stew

Scotch broth is a traditionally hearty, filling soup principally comprised of barley, stewing or braising cuts of meat, root vegetables, and dried pulses. I’m not qualified to venture a guess as to how much the meatiness is essential. Take it out, is it still Scotch broth? Or are we left with a chunky vegetable barley soup? I’m not sure it matters. To me, back when I did eat meat and had the occasional bowl of Scotch broth, the part I savored most was the satisfying, flavourful warmth of it. I especially loved the smooth and almost melting textures of the root vegetables. So until someone informs me that it’s some kind of blasphemy to call a vegan dish “Scotch broth”, that’s what I’m going with. 

Thanksgiving is just weeks away, and this kind of hands-off, hearty soup is the perfect comfort food to give a moment’s pause to think about the many things, even in our broken tumultuous times, to be thankful for. Barley lends such a creamy richness to any dish without the cream, especially when prepared in the slow cooker. Speaking of which, the cooking method may deservedly be up there among the best blessings of the busy season, at least when it comes to dinnertime. 

 

Call it Scotch broth or not, this simple seasonal soup–or whatever variation works for you–should stand a trial chance at becoming a regular as we come into the winter. Meatless, but packed with meaty, nutrient-rich vegetables and chewy grains. And who can help but admire the way the crockpot opens its arms and welcomes whatever ingredients you hastily toss its way, then simmers away all day and fills your house with inviting aromas to come home to? Best of all, the hands-off cooking time frees you up to attend to other things, even if only for an hour. This week, “other things” meant more time crafting with my fluffy-haired little turkey. A perfect combo I’ll take any day. 

 

 

 

Slow Cooker Vegan Scotch Broth
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup pearl barley, rinsed
  2. 1/2 cup red lentils, rinsed
  3. 1/2 cup split peas, rinsed
  4. 4 cups vegetable stock
  5. 2 cups water
  6. 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  7. 1 leek, sliced
  8. 2 carrots, diced
  9. 1 large turnip, diced
  10. 1 rutabaga, diced
  11. 2 sticks of celery, sliced
  12. 1 large potato, diced
  13. sea salt and pepper to taste
  14. 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  15. 1/4 cup chopped parsley, or to taste
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients in slow cooker and cook on low 8 hours.
Happy Apple Natural Kitchen http://www.happyapplekitchen.com/

Creamy vegan carrot ginger soup

Yesterday morning F and I went for a lovely, quiet hike with friends and all throughout we were kissed by notes of fall. Actually, it was light rain that left those soft caresses on our faces, but it was kind of the same thing. The cool drizzle was so welcome after weeks of dry heat, and it only enhanced the colors, fragrances and general changes signifying the turning of the seasons. It offered a chance to pause within and explore without. It inspired feeling that was both contentedly free and pleasantly melancholy.

Time and again, no matter how well we are conditioned to expect it, it’s amazing and startling and mystifying how we can awaken as if magically into a new season. Like watching kids grow. One day back-to-school banners highlight a sort of sullen near outrage because in truth summer is still actually in full swing. Then blink, we may as well be preparing for the departure of pumpkin spice lattes in order to make way for the pleasures of peppermint. Those rare chances to pause, wherever we find them, mean everything.

I’ve got nothing to complain about, but have been feeling a little buried under must-dos lately. That’s why despite plenty of kitchen play I haven’t been recording much, and why this post will be so short. It’s also part of what makes this soup so perfect for sharing right now. The busyness, and ushering in of autumn. This is simple, easily adaptable, robust and flavorful soup that is resonant with the season. Bright and ablaze with one of fall’s signature colors, yet comforting and soothing in a way that grants a moment of stillness in a sip. It’s scrape the pot and savor each spoonful soup. That’s all you need to know. Try it (and tell me how you change it to be a just-right-fit for you). You’ll see. 🙂

Creamy vegan carrot ginger soup
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 yellow onion, diced
  2. 7 medium carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
  3. 3 medium gold potatoes, scrubbed and chopped
  4. 1 tablespoon fresh ginger root, minced
  5. 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  6. ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
  7. ½ teaspoon ground paprika
  8. 1 teaspoon sea salt
  9. Dash red pepper flakes (quick light shake)
  10. ¾ cup raw cashews, soaked in water for 1 hour and drained
  11. 1 cup coconut milk
Instructions
  1. Coat a stockpot or large saucepan with cooking spray or heat water to cover bottom of pan. Saute onions over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until translucent, about 4 minutes.
  2. Add carrots, potatoes, ginger, and spices (garlic powder through red pepper flakes) and cook a further 2-3 minutes, stirring. Add cashews, coconut milk, and 5 cups water to pan and bring to a near boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and let simmer for 20-30 minutes, until carrots and potatoes are tender.
  3. Use an immersion blender to puree, or puree in batches in a blender. Adjust seasonings and add liquid to taste as needed.
Happy Apple Natural Kitchen http://www.happyapplekitchen.com/

Spring vegetable quinoa soup with lemon basil pesto

It’s Earth Day week, and I had this idea of concocting some kind of richly earthy sort of stew I hadn’t made before. Just thinking of it, I couldn’t quell the word umami from resonating in my head with deep, ringing tones. Something about umami; if Yoda was a taste, umami would he be.

Featured in this stew, there would have to be brown lentils, mushrooms, burdock root…that last one mainly because I only just discovered its existence last fall when I tested out a recipe that included it for Yoga Journal, and it seems to epitomize earthiness with a sort of mysticism attached. So, there was an ingredients list. Then, not even halfway through the week I decided to chuck it, for now. 

Actually, so fat I don’t like burdock root. This may well change, easily, depending on what I learn about amazing benefits like blood purification and lymphatic system strengthening that I can’t possibly get anywhere else.  But for now, I’m just not a huge fan of the sinewy woodiness, or the fact that the earthiness is really actual earth. And the brown, knobby lumpiness of my ingredients seemed more suitable for a witch’s bubbling cauldron than my envisioned rustic family dinner honoring Earth Day.

spring soup (1)
Instead we’re relishing  something light and bright and fresh that sings spring that I originally made for Ancient Harvest. You can vary the vegetables, the amounts, the herbs. You can load up the veggies and still savor a light yet satisfying meal. I love the way the pesto makes the flavors pop.

I may have mentioned before, lately I’ve been driving myself a little more batty than usual in my personal quest to expand knowledge. Instead of really challenging myself and poring over, say, financial journals or exploring other areas outside of my comfort zone, I’ve been diving headlong into more of what am already interested in, was already reading/watching/listening to. Foremost, that’s food and nutrition. Lately, lagging just a hair behind, toxins in our environment. It’s not the healthiest thing, going further and further into the abyss that is all the ugly, greedy, and despicable in the world and repeatedly reinforcing how little we can do about it. 

spring soup (8)

But at least there is always a little we can do. And if there is anything worth taking little, or any size, steps for, it’s our planet. We only have one. 

Different people need different diets, and few things are as off-putting as people assuming they’re due some kind of applause for theirs. But no one argues with the power of produce, and the significant impact such a delicious choice can make on personal health and the health of the whole planet. This week, of all weeks, it feels especially good to love seasonal vegetables. Happy Earth Day!

Spring vegetable quinoa soup with lemon basil pesto
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup quinoa, any variety
  2. 1/4 cup olive oil, divided
  3. 1 leeks halved lengthwise and thinly sliced (white and light green portions)
  4. 2 medium carrots, diced
  5. 3 cups low sodium vegetable broth
  6. 3 cups water
  7. 8 asparagus spears, trimmed and cut diagonally in approximately 1-inch pieces
  8. 1 1/2 cups kale leaves, ribs removed and chopped
  9. 1 cup cooked navy or white cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
  10. 1 cup fresh or frozen corn
  11. 1 cup torn basil leaves
  12. 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  13. 1/4 cup walnuts
  14. 3 cloves garlic
  15. Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Cook quinoa according to package directions and set aside.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add leek and carrots sweat 3-4 minutes.
  3. Add vegetable broth and water and bring to a low boil. Add asparagus, peas, kale, beans and corn. Cook 5-7 minutes, until asparagus is tender.
  4. Prepare the pesto: place basil, lemon juice, pine nuts, garlic, and remaining olive oil in a food processor and pulse until smooth.
  5. Stir in quinoa and half of the pesto. Bring to a gentle simmer and cook, stirring, 5 minutes. Thin to desired consistency with extra water as needed. Salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Ladle into bowls and serve with remaining pesto spooned on top.
Happy Apple Natural Kitchen http://www.happyapplekitchen.com/

One pot chili vegetable quinoa

So I lied, but I didn’t mean to. I’m talking about the other week…weeks ago now, actually. That time when I jinxed myself by reveling in how healthy our immune systems have (had, actually) been since little F took over the (our) world. (Basking a bit but not boasting, or crowing, right? Please reassure me there was no crowing.)

Quinoa

Sick (1 of 3)In any case, you don’t have to be superstitious to wisely choose not to tempt fate, and I am both a little superstitious and apt to be unwise, so the deck was set. Shortly after that last post, I woke up at 5:45 am with what felt like the beginnings of a cold. By 5:45 pm I had a low grade fever, a chesty cough, full-on chills and body aches. Maybe I’m whining just a tad when I say so, but it was agony. And one week later, when we finally stopped referring to “this flu-like virus” and started cursing the flu, it was still agony. 

The worst part was, little F came down with it, too. The first few days really hammered him, sweet boy, and even included extra features like vomiting at the onset. I couldn’t leave him even half awake for a moment without tears. We all want our mamas when we’re sick.

Cuddles are precious, not least feverish clingy cuddles, but the sweetness of these tends to be mostly drowned out in worry. Adding to that worry was worry for those we’d unwittingly exposed, including those same lovelies who had been accidentally misled just the week previous by  omissions in this brownie recipe (now corrected!). Ouch. Reading book after book, Little F and I kept gravitating to reprises of Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good Very Bad Day.

This chili vegetable quinoa was on our meal plan for that week. It’s an easy, colorful, fun-to-vary, comforting one pot meal I love. It’s not worth elaborating, but I do think the placement of chili before vegetable quinoa is important, by the way. Because it’s not chili, more like chili-flavored, imho. And on that note, the addition of the raisins near the end heightens the flavors, to me.

Quinoa-2

While we were sick, having just completed our big shop for the week, ironically my dad sent me this article from the Daily Telegraph on superfood quinoa and its destiny to feed the world. But you know how it can go…when you are feeling the worst and most need a hearty boost of health…that’s when all you want is plain dry toast (me) or cheerios (F) or nothing (both of us, depending on the day). Our quinoa power supper(s) –because you make plenty of leftovers– was destined to wait until we were more markedly on the mend, which is, at last, now. And now it tastes amazing.

This dish is actually a remake that became its own. It started as a chili chicken couscous from Everyday Epicurean, a cookbook my little sister bought me years and years ago and I still love, even though since going meatless and dairy-free so many recipes are off the table now. Maybe especially so, because the dishes are simple, elegant and sumptuous and therefore so much fun to create a plant-based variation of.

Quinoa-4

I already said I love this rustic, hearty dish, but the truth is until recently I had forgotten how much I loved it…previosly in its original chicken and fewer vegetables version and especially now. Lately I’ve been going back into the archives of “what we used to eat” and having fun converting those dishes. Sort of old-becomes-new.

Speaking of, old-becomes-new may well be one of several key motifs floating through how we approach things this year. Investing in the little things. Little kindnesses, little steps toward big goals. I also find myself being more mindful of practicing mindfulness to get through craziness than I ever have before. And rediscovering old-becomes-new.

Quinoa-7

For example, I’ve been unearthing pre-pregnancy clothes I had tucked away and forgotten about. Yay! They’re “new”. Also I’ve been resurrecting old clothes I’d similarly forgotten about that perhaps go back as far as high school–my sister’s high school experience most likely, since if they’re worth saving they’re probably her hand-me-downs. Hooray! New.

The reason for this is stinginess is traditionally Dave and I limit splurging to athletic gear and healthy groceries. But amid these rediscoveries I’ve come close to complimenting us as having been pioneers in the minimalist movement. Small house, 30 items of clothing you see again and again, since way back, decades ago…just kidding. I don’t really think we were pioneers. And even if I did believe that, I would be careful how much of a compliment I gave us. I do not want to tempt the jinxing powers of the universe. I will stick to keeping faith in modest, day-to-day home-cooking and quinoa.

One-pot chili vegetable quinoa
Serves 4
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 teaspoons olive oil or cooking spray
  2. 1 onion, chopped
  3. 3 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  5. 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  6. 2 teaspoons chili powder
  7. 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  8. 1 14-ounce can diced tomatoes
  9. 1 1/2 cups quinoa, rinsed
  10. 3 cups vegetable broth
  11. 3 cups water
  12. 1 zucchini, chopped
  13. 1 medium carrot, chopped
  14. 1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cubed
  15. 1 bell pepper, seeded and chopped
  16. 1 15-ounce can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  17. 1/2 cup raisins
  18. 1/4 cup plus two tablespoons cilantro, chopped
  19. salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Coat a large stockpot with cooking spray or the 2 teaspoons olive oil and heat. Add onion and cook, stirring regularly, approximately 3 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook a further 2 minutes.
  2. Add cinnamon paprika, chili powder, and tomato paste. Stir continuously a few minutes over medium-low heat until fragrant.
  3. Add tomatoes, quinoa, broth, water, and all the vegetables (through pepper). Bring to a light boil, then reduce heat and simmer 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Add the chickpeas, raisins and 1/4 cup cilantro and cook, stirring occasionally, approximately 5 minutes. Serve in bowls garnished with remaining cilantro.
Happy Apple Natural Kitchen http://www.happyapplekitchen.com/

Pin It on Pinterest